Effect of chicken raw materials on physicochemical and microbiological properties of ‎mechanically deboned chicken meat

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Student Research Committee, Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National ‎Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎

2 Department of Food Sciences and Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and ‎Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎

3 Food and Drug Laboratory Research Center, Food and Drug Organization, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran‎

4 Department of Food Control, Food and Drug Organization, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran‎

5 Food Safety Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Excessive consumption of red meat is associated with various diseases including coronary heart diseases and cancer. Lower health-related problems of chicken meat, consumption of chicken meat, and mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) have been increased due to their cheaper prices. Thereby, chemical, microbial, and physical causes of chicken meat losses and the safety aspects are needed to be fully considered to save food by improved application of chicken meat and its by-product. This study investigated the effects of chicken classes, layer, and broiler, and different carcass cuts, fillet, skeleton, and the whole carcass, on physicochemical, protein, fat, ash, moisture, pH, and peroxide, and microbiological, total plate counts, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Campylobacter, and Salmonella, characteristics as well as introducing content changes of metal elements iron, calcium (Ca), lead, cadmium, and arsenic in MDCM. The highest values of physicochemical characteristics, calcium, iron, and heavy metals were observed in deboned layer chicken carcass and deboned broiler skeleton (p<0.05). Although Escherichia coli was detected in all of the treatments, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, and Campylobacter contamination were found only in the deboned layer and broiler skeleton. In conclusion, the application of MDCM by-products in meat products without thermal processing is not recommended. The broiler and layer skeleton MDCMs are not suitable for human consumption due to the high contents of heavy metals. However, the whole carcasses of layer chickens are suitable to be mutually used in MDCM at the end of the egg laying period.

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